How Virtual Reality is being used today

How Virtual Reality is being used today

What is Virtual Reality?

Virtual Reality (VR) is the use of computer technology to create a simulated environment. Unlike traditional user interfaces, VR places the user inside an experience. Instead of viewing a screen in front of them, users are immersed and able to interact with 3D worlds. By simulating as many senses as possible, such as vision, hearing, touch, even smell, the computer is transformed into a gatekeeper to this artificial world. The only limits to near-real VR experiences are the availability of content and cheap computing power.

What’s the difference Between Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality?

Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality are two sides of the same coin. You could think of Augmented Reality as VR with one foot in the real world: Augmented Reality simulates artificial objects in the real environment; Virtual Reality creates an artificial environment to inhabit.

In Augmented Reality, the computer uses sensors and algorithms to determine the position and orientation of a camera. AR technology then renders the 3D graphics as they would appear from the viewpoint of the camera, superimposing the computer-generated images over a user’s view of the real world.

In Virtual Reality, the computer uses similar sensors and math. However, rather than locating a real camera within a physical environment, the position of the user’s eyes are located within the simulated environment. If the user’s head turns, the graphics react accordingly. Rather than compositing virtual objects and a real scene, VR technology creates a convincing, interactive world for the user.

Virtual Reality technology


Virtual Reality’s most immediately-recognizable component is the head-mounted display (HMD). Human beings are visual creatures, and display technology is often the single biggest difference between immersive Virtual Reality systems and traditional user interfaces. For instance, CAVE automatic virtual environments actively display virtual content onto room-sized screens. While they are fun for people in universities and big labs, consumer and industrial wearables are the wild west.

With a multiplicity of emerging hardware and software options, the future of wearables is unfolding but yet unknown. Concepts such as the HTC Vive Pro Eye, Oculus Quest and Playstation VR are leading the way, but there are also players like Google, Apple, Samsung, Lenovo and others who may surprise the industry with new levels of immersion and usability. Whomever comes out ahead, the simplicity of buying a helmet-sized device that can work in a living-room, office, or factory floor has made HMDs center stage when it comes to Virtual Reality technologies. You can ask who is founding fathers of virtual reality - Jaron Lanier.

Lets see how  Virtual Reality is being used today.


Unsurprisingly, the video games industry is one of the largest proponents of Virtual Reality. Support for the Oculus Rift headsets has already been jerry-rigged into games like Skyrim and Grand Theft Auto, but newer games like Elite: Dangerous come with headset support built right in. Many tried-and-true user interface metaphors in gaming have to be adjusted for VR (after all, who wants to have to pick items out of a menu that takes up your entire field of vision?), but the industry has been quick to adapt as the hardware for true Virtual Reality gaming has become more widely available.

Virtual Reality and data visualization

Scientific and engineering data visualization has benefited for years from Virtual Reality, although recent innovation in display technology has generated interest in everything from molecular visualization to architecture to weather models.

VR for aviation, medicine, and the military

In aviation, medicine, and the military, Virtual Reality training is an attractive alternative to live training with expensive equipment, dangerous situations, or sensitive technology. Commercial pilots can use realistic cockpits with VR technology in holistic training programs that incorporate virtual flight and live instruction. Surgeons can train with virtual tools and patients, and transfer their virtual skills into the operating room, and studies have already begun to show that such training leads to faster doctors who make fewer mistakes. Police and soldiers are able to conduct virtual raids that avoid putting lives at risk.


Virtual Reality and the treatment of mental illness
 

Speaking of medicine, the treatment of mental illness, including post-traumatic stress disorder, stands to benefit from the application of Virtual Reality technology to ongoing therapy programs. Whether it’s allowing veterans to confront challenges in a controlled environment, or overcoming phobias in combination with behavioral therapy, VR has a potential beyond gaming, industrial and marketing applications to help people heal from, reconcile and understand real-world experiences.


Walt Disney World Virtual Rides 

Walt Disney World may have temporarily closed its doors in the spirit of social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy all the thrills and charm of the most magical place on earth.

While we can’t experience the theme parks in person right now, the Virtual Disney World YouTube channel can help you relive the attractions and places you love at Walt Disney World anytime and anywhere. Virtual Disney World is not affiliated, sponsored or endorsed by Walt Disney World, but its interactive 360-degree videos can help you connect with the place where dreams come true — something we may all need during this difficult time.Take your virtual tour now.
 

Virtual reality in commercial real estate

One of those industries seemingly primed for disruption seems to be commercial real estate. An industry predicated on selling property that’s solely used for business purposes that are leased out to provide workspace, rather than a living space. You can’t quite ‘disrupt’ an industry in the typical ‘Uber’ fashion when they own the very bricks your office may be in. But that being said, there’s a major chance for commercial real estate to adapt and position itself for the 21st century.

For years now, creative technologists from Forbes.com, BBJ.com and bizjournals.com have speculated on virtual reality being a prime tool for commercial real estate firms (and architects) to utilize to help sell and even ‘dress’ space for selling purposes. Many of whom see VR as a tool to help expedite the stakeholders’ decision-making and reduce design phases, while translating difficult design concepts for everyone to view.


Published by Oksana Kvitka

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